UnderwriterAbout Us

101 Things You Didn't Know Could Harm Your Pet

101 Things
You Didn't Know Could Harm Your Pet

8. Perilous Plants

All sorts of plants are at #79 on our list, and they’re to blame for about 4% of the 165,900 emergency calls placed to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center in 2011. Cats can be particularly attracted to the smell and texture of plants and, according to the Animal Poison Control Center, they’re involved in plant-related poisonings more often than dogs.

Tiger lilies in particular are extremely poisonous to cats. All parts of this plant are toxic to felines and can result in renal failure if eaten. Cats who eat tiger lilies may show symptoms including lethargy, lack of appetite, vomiting, and increased thirst. In these cases, cats should be treated immediately.

If you have any of the plants on this list, be sure to keep them out of your pet’s reach or consider removing them altogether. If your pet eats a harmful plant, the Animal Poison Control Center can help at 1-888-426-4435. A $65 consultation fee may apply, 90% of which is covered by ASPCA Pet Health Insurance. Learn more about what we cover now.

  • Aloe
  • Amaryllis
  • Andromeda Japonica
  • Asian Lily
  • Asparagus Fern
  • Australian Nut
  • Autumn Crocus
  • Azalea
  • Belladonna
  • Bird of Paradise
  • Bittersweet (American and European)
  • Black Locust
  • Branching Ivy
  • Buckeye
  • Buddhist Pine
  • Caladium
  • Calla Lily
  • Castor Bean
  • Ceriman
  • Clematis
  • Cordatum
  • Corn Plant
  • Cycads
  • Cyclamen
  • Daffodil
  • Daylily
  • Devil’s Ivy
  • Dieffenbachia
  • Dumbcane
  • Easter Lily
  • Elephant Ears
  • Emerald Fern
  • English Ivy
  • Eucalyptus
  • Ferns
  • Fiddle-leaf Philodendron
  • Gold Dust Dracaena
  • Florida Beauty
  • Foxglove
  • Glacier Ivy
  • Gladiolas
  • Golden Pothos
  • Heavenly Bamboo
  • Honeysuckle
  • Hurricane Plant
  • Hyacinth
  • Hydrangea
  • Iris
  • Jerusalem Cherry
  • Jimson Weed
  • Kalanchoe
  • Lantana
  • Lilies (all Lilium species)
  • Lily of the Valley
  • Lupine
  • Marble Queen
  • Morning Glory
  • Mother-in-Law
  • Mountain Laurel
  • Narcissus
  • Needlepoint Ivy
  • Nephthysis
  • Nightshade
  • Oleander
  • Panda
  • Peace Lily
  • Philodendron
  • Poison Hemlock
  • Precatory Bean (Rosary Pea)
  • Privet
  • Red Emerald
  • Rhododendron
  • Ribbon Plant
  • Sago Palm
  • Satin Pothos
  • Schefflera
  • Striped Dracaena
  • Sweetheart Ivy
  • Tulip
  • Water Hemlock
  • Wisteria
  • Yew
  • Yucca

*Sources: ASPCA.org and internal claims data. For details or a copy, contact jennifer.s@hartvillegroup.com.

+Customer stories are examples of recent claim payouts. Reimbursement is subject to the terms and conditions of your plan. Identifying information has been changed.

This is not a complete description of all coverage terms, conditions, and limitations; see your plan for a full description. Issuance of coverage is subject to underwriting. Discounts are subject to eligibility requirements. Specific products, features, and discounts may vary and may not be available in all states. Rates and coverage subject to change. Additional deductible and co-insurance options may be available.

ASPCA Pet Health Insurance is underwritten by the United States Fire Insurance Company and administered by Petsmarketing Insurance.com Agency, Inc., a subsidiary of the Hartville Group, Inc. Petsmarketing Insurance.com Agency, Inc. and the Hartville Group, Inc. are collectively and individually referred to as Hartville or Hartville Group. The ASPCA does not offer insurance. Through a strategic licensing agreement, in exchange for the use of ASPCA trademarks, the ASPCA is paid a royalty fee of up to 10% of the purchase price, with a minimum of $1.95 million to be recognized over at least three years.

© 2012, The Hartville Group, ASPCA Logo, Copyright 2012, ASPCA. All Rights Reserved.

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center - 1-888-426-4435